Faster data move on EXADATA I

15 05 2013

Introduction

In my work among other things I tune and tweak solutions for EXADATA. Today I’ll write about a big improvement we achieved with a process that moves data from the operational tables to the ones where the history is stored.

This will not be a technical post. While I talk about using advanced technologies, I will not discuss code or deep details of them in this post.

And yes, when I say post, I mean a series of posts. This will be too long to be a single post. I’ll break it up into an introduction and then a post on each area of improvement.

Let’s first discuss the before situation. This set of tables are logged to during the day. These log records are needed both to investigate how transactions were executed as well as to satisfy legal requirements. It is in a highly regulated industry and for good reason as mistakes could put someone’s life in danger.

In this situation the solutions were writing around 50 million log records per day to five tables. These tables all had a primary key based on a sequence and there was also referential integrity set up. This means that for the indexes, all processes were writing to the same place on disk. The lookup on the referential integrity was also looking at the same place. An attempt to remedy some of this had been made by hash partitioning the tables. The write activity was intense enough during the day that most of the logging had to be turned off as the solution otherwise was too slow. This of course has legal as well as diagnostic implications.

What’s worse is that once all that data was written, it had to be moved to another database where the history is kept. This process was even slower and the estimate for how long it would take to move one days worth of data was 16 hours. It never did run for that long as it was not allowed to run during the day, it had to start after midnight and finish before 7 am. As a result the volume built up every night until logging was turned off for a while and the move then caught up a little every night.

This series will have the following parts:

  1. Introduction (this post)
  2. Writing log records
  3. Moving to history tables
  4. Reducing storage requirements
  5. Wrap-up and summary

The plan is to publish one part each week. Hopefully I’ll have time to publish some more technical posts between the posts in this series.

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